Spectre Museum

After having read a humongous amount of books from a wide variety of genres, I have finally figured out the genre that pleases me the most. *DRUM ROLLS* No other genre of literature quenches my thirst for reading as much as Historical Fiction.

Observing the love being showered on the Pulitzer Prize winner of 2015, All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, I decided to give this fiction a try. Doerr brings into life the siege, bombardments and the terror of World War II through the memoirs of his two young protagonists, Werner and Marie-Laurie. He sketches the voyage of Werner from his little home in a French countryside to tracking radio waves for Hitler’s army and Marie-Laurie’s sightless journey from Paris to Saint-Malo with the Sea of Flames.

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Needless to say, I adored the work with all my heart and I am happy to have read this masterpiece. I loved the descriptions the author paints to delineate the cruelty experienced by people at the outset of the war. Very few authors have talked about the pain France had to undergo during the war, at least I haven’t read anything related to France being victimized during the World Wars. My heart went out to all the characters in the book, be it the German or French, victims or the terrorists, because everyone had the other side to their story. Each character lost something crucial in their lives because pain never felt the need to resort to only one. However, I wouldn’t say this is my favourite historical fiction set in World War II, there are other books I liked better.  Anyway, it was a good read and I rated this book 4.75/5 on goodreads.

Vale of Unforgotten Memories

“For I have known them all already, known them all-                                                     Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons,                                                                 I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.”

-T.S. Eliot

Some ten or twenty years hence, when we would look back at all the events that have shaped us into who we would be, we’d smile to look at all those times we had laughed at the tiny jokes, enjoyed a drink with a friend or two, cried at the times we thought we had lost everything; and realise how much we’ve changed. And it is this realisation that shall keep us alive even when our weakening symmetry might start giving up.

Arthur Golden has written one of the most beautiful memoirs I have come across until now. No, it isn’t a recollection of his life events. Surprisingly, it is a memoir of a woman, to be precise, a geisha. Memoirs of a Geisha is a work of fiction that brings into light the life of one of the geishas of Kyoto, her journey from a small fishing village called Yoroido to being one of the best geishas of Japan. Sayuri, a fisherman’s six-year old daughter comes across a man named Tanaka and that meeting changes her life forever. The day she met Tanaka was the “best and the worst” day of her life.

Was her name really Sayuri?

 What was that about the meeting that changed her life?

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 Golden’s literary composition is beyond praise, he has written this book in first person narrative. Besides, it took him six years to finish this masterpiece as he had written it from three different perspectives before finally coming up with Sayuri’s point of view. The memoir will leave you amazed. There was so much to acquire from this book, the Japanese culture, the lifestyle of geishas, their best times, their worst times. Especially, the get-up of these ladies, believe me you’d urge to be dressed as a geisha and visit Kyoto at least once in your life after reading the spectacular images Golden paints. Honestly, this is one of my favourite books and I would highly recommend you to go and read it as soon as possible. Admittedly, I was flipping through the pages without any hesitation and I could not bring myself to believe that I had finished reading a five-hundred page book within three days.

“We rise; shapes cluster around us in welcome, dissolving and forming again and dissolving again like fireflies in a summer evening.”

-Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

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